“I hope and pray that someone, sometime, will found a memorial mothers day commemorating her for the matchless service she renders to humanity in every field of life. She is entitled to it,” said Anna Jarvis, the person responsible for the observance of Mother’s Day. Mother’s Day was first observed in America in 1908, when Jarvis held a memorial for her mother at Saint Andrew’s Methodist Church in West Virginia, after campaigning for three years. Her campaign was successful, and by 1914, Congress made Mother’s Day an official holiday. Sadly, like many things in America, Mother’s Day has become a commercial holiday. By 1924, cards, candy, and carnations became the standard gifts for moms throughout the country. By 1924, Jarvis became resentful of the commercialization of the holiday and wanted to abolish the holiday. Fast forward several decades and we see that Mother’s Day is one of the most significant “Hallmark” holidays. Last year, we spent $20 billion for our moms. The many love languages have been reduced to cards, candy, and carnations. This Mother’s Day, let us go back to Jarvis’ original vision and recognize mom “for the matchless service she renders to humanity in every field of life.”

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