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pray

Would you join me in praying for our president that he may know Christ?

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Would you join me in praying for our president that he may know Christ?

First of all, then, I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for all people, for kings and all who are in high positions, that we may lead a peaceful and quiet life, godly and dignified in every way. This is good, and it is pleasing in the sight of God our Savior. — 1 Timothy 2:1–3

Most Christians would agree that they want to please God. In 1 Timothy, the Apostle Paul teaches that praying for all people, including kings and those in leadership, is good and pleasing to God. Last Sunday, June 2, 2019, Franklin Graham called for a special day of prayer for President Donald Trump. Many believers, especially those who do not endorse Trump as president, disagreed with Graham and thought that his call to pray was more political in nature. Some churches opted to not address Graham’s call to pray. When David Platt, pastor of McLean Bible Church in VA prayed for the President during an unscheduled visit at his church on Sunday, he prayed for the president by laying hands on him. This simple act of praying for President Trump upset some members of his church and he had to write a letter to his congregation concerning his prayer because Pratt’s prayer for the president was viewed as his endorsement of the sitting president. To clarify the concerns of many he wrote, “My aim was in no way to endorse the president, his policies, or his party, but to obey God’s command to pray for our president and other leaders to govern in the way this passage portrays.” He then made an apology for hurting some members and asked for grace. As a pastor, I respect and admire David Platt’s ministry. However, I do not think he had to apologize for obeying Scripture. Whether we endorse our president or not, we are called to pray for him. The Well Church, would you join me in praying for our president that he may know Christ? It is good and pleasing to God.

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Who do you need to pray for today?

Who do you need to pray for today?

Moreover, as for me, far be it from me that I should sin against the LORD by ceasing to pray for you, and I will instruct you in the good and the right way. - 1 Samuel 12:23

In Birmingham, AL, a first-grade teacher who prayed with her class before lunch every day was told to stop due to a complaint from the Freedom From Religion Foundation (FFRF). The complaint states, “A concerned parent has report that a first-grade teacher at Norwood Elementary School leads her students in prayer every day before lunch.” What is the big deal with prayer by a teacher? The FFRF responded, “Public school teachers and administrators may not promote religion by leading students in prayer, encouraging students to pray, participating in student-initiated prayer, or otherwise endorsing religion to students.” How would you feel if you were that reprimanded teacher? What would you do? In this week’s Scripture reading, we see Samuel’s role changing after the inauguration of King Saul. He is no longer the Judge of Israel, however, he continues to represent God as a prophet who gives the word of God to all Israel, including the king. At his farewell address as a Judge to Israel in 1 Samuel 12, he encourages Israel to “serve the Lord with all your heart … [f]or the Lord will not forsake his people, for his great name’s sake” (vv. 21-22). As God’s prophet and representative, he promised that he would not cease to pray for Israel (v. 23). I believe that the action of the FFRF is not necessarily a loss for the teacher or Christians. Just as Samuel interceded for all Israel in his new role, she and we can privately intercede for those around us. As it is written, “First of all, then, I urge that supplications, prayers, intercessions, and thanksgivings be made for all people” (1 Timothy 2:1). Who do you need to pray for today? Let us boldly lift up prayers in faith.

What can we do to achieve our mission?

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What can we do to achieve our mission?

 As listed in our bulletin, our mission is to connect people to God, one another, and the world. Part of this strategy is to give our very best on Sundays. Many believe that with great worship experiences — good preaching, excellent music, first-class children’s program, great fellowship, etc. — new people will naturally come. This is far from the truth. For a church to flourish, evangelism must be central to its life. Hoping that people will come to our great church cannot be our strategy. The Gospel Coalition recommends looking at your networks (family, neighborhood, vocational, recreational, and commercial) and do one of the following five tasks: 

  1. Pray for them—You’ll be surprised what happens when you begin to pray for the people in your path.

  2. Invite them—Invite them over to eat dinner, to play sports, to go to a movie, to come with you to a church event.

  3. Serve them—Identify a way that you can bless those in your networks. Babysit for them, pick up groceries for them, cut their grass, and so on.

  4. Give resources to them—Ask them to read a book or article with you, or to listen to a sermon or podcast. Discuss these resources with them.

  5. Share the gospel with them—Look for various places where you can talk about your faith. Let your friend know you are part of a church, and see if they ask questions. Listen to their problems with real concern, and then seize the opportunity to address the problems with gospel hope.

Let’s further discuss and brainstorm today at our family meeting in how we can let others know about our life-changing Savior. 

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